Tag Archives: corporatocracy

Artisan products a drag on productivity ?

According to Australian Productivity Commission bakers of ‘artisan products’ and ‘ international style  breads … with healthy additives like whole grains’ as well as small wine makers of organic & boutique wines are a ‘small but notable’ drag on Australia’s productivity.

How dare you people for wanting (by European standards) half decent bread ! Go back to the white chewing gum like substance with every preservative known to man coming out of factories manned by underpaid serfs [and I can attest to this when I moved down under in the early 90’s].

Wrong priority anyone ??? Takes ones breath away that these clowns, so far removed from reality, having an influence on government policy. But then again, their colleagues in energy policy are probably coming from the same school of thought.

Source: Australian Financial Review Tue 29th April 2014 (unfortunately blocked by pay-wall)

Edit (2014-04-30): Also published Sydney Morning Herald: http://www.smh.com.au/business/national-business/artisan-products-a-drag-on-productivity-20140429-zr157.html

Food, Fuel, and the Global Land Grab

This article by Lester R. Brown in the World Future Society Blog is an excellent read on the effects of wealthy sovereign and corporate interests. These foreign interests are blocking valuable land in poorer countries to produce output largely exported, with little to no benefits for the local population.

Growing demand for food and fuel has put pressure on the world’s agricultural lands to produce more. Now, a trend in “land grabbing” has emerged, as wealthy countries lease or buy farms and agribusiness in poorer countries to ensure their own future supplies. The result may be further economic disparities and even “food wars.”

Original Article: http://www.wfs.org/futurist/january-february-2013-vol-47-no-1/food-fuel-and-global-land-grab

Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

Worth the listen – a NPR Radio program on ‘development-supported agriculture’, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture that is meant to draw in new buyers, increase values and stitch neighbors together.

“Golf courses cost millions to build and maintain, and we’re kind of overbuilt on golf courses already,” he says. “If you put in a farm where we can grow things and make money from the farm, it becomes an even better deal.”

Listen here: Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms : The Salt : NPR.

March Against Monsanto

Unfortunately (but predictably) mainstream media has pretty much ignored the over 400 events designed to raise public awareness of the practices of this company and their paid lobbyists.

Media Links