Tag Archives: sustainability

Politics of Bioregional Democracy

The following article is an excellent read by James Bernard Quilligan in Kosmos Journal on the future of water scarcity and security.

Water scarcity is the result of climate change, diminished rainfall, overpopulation, inefficient infrastructure, over-pumping of aquifers, pollution and wasteful agricultural practices. Nearly three billion people around the world are experiencing periodic water shortages. It’s affecting people in southern and northern Africa, the Middle East, the nations of central Asia, China, India, Australia, Mexico and southwestern United States.

Far from only discussing the problems the article also goes intThe Self: Human Dignity through Bioregional Identity

Every life is sacred from conception to death. Respecting the lives of sentient beings is at the core of human existence. Human dignity is the basis of freedom, justice and social solidarity. But the reality is that very few people receive the respect they deserve. When individuals abuse power and wealth, they create imbalances with others in society. This is how human potential is suppressed and why human rights often do not deal with the fundamental reason for these disparities.

All in all this is a highly recommended read for anybody interested in the the politics around water which after all is one of the most crucial elements of food production. No matter where and at which intensity.

Original Article: http://www.kosmosjournal.org/article/human-watershed-the-emerging-politics-of-bioregional-democracy/

Integrating plant biology and environmental engineering

“When it comes to agriculture in NH, we are like an underdeveloped country.” So says Dorn Cox who is currently making a concerted effort to push farming squarely into the 21st century by building what he refers to as a “biological system” for his farm; it is a most singular system and very much a family enterprise.
By successfully integrating the disciplines of plant biology and environmental engineering, Dorn is constructing a near complete carbon cycle making the farm largely self sufficient, reducing production costs, and limiting off farm purchases.
Dorn Cox is a two-time NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant awardee. He has completed his 2006 grant for Farm-based Biofuel: Production, Storage, Co-generation and Education. He is a 2007 New Hampshire Young Farmer Achievement Award recipient.

Dorn Cox – Tuckaway Farms – Lee, New Hampshire

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

A Living Web Films Production.

Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

Worth the listen – a NPR Radio program on ‘development-supported agriculture’, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture that is meant to draw in new buyers, increase values and stitch neighbors together.

“Golf courses cost millions to build and maintain, and we’re kind of overbuilt on golf courses already,” he says. “If you put in a farm where we can grow things and make money from the farm, it becomes an even better deal.”

Listen here: Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms : The Salt : NPR.

After The Fish Are Gone

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The video above shows the horrenous statistic that 85 percent of the world’s fisheries have been depleted to their limits or totally exploited.

GoodFishBadFish: Seafood and Sustainability

Came across this excellent Australian website featuring an online tool, designed to assist home cooks and people interested in seafood choosing the right fish for the dish.
The Right Fish for the Dish: pick your fish from a list to find out about species and their sustainability, alternatives and cooking tips.

The GoodFishBadFish Seafood Converter is an easy online tool, designed
to assist home cooks and people interested in seafood.

GoodFishBadFish Website Screenshot

GoodFishBadFish Website